Landmarks and Monuments

From earliest times landmarks and monuments have been important markers and points of reference for travellers and explorers, and many of these landmarks have taken on religious, cultural or geographic significance. Each country has its own landmarks which provide a unique insight into that country’s cultural identity. Our project wishes to utilise these landmarks to engage the pupils in a cross-curricular project. We will explore landmarks and monuments that are present in the life of the pupil: Home/School/, Locality, National and Parliamentary.

Jan
22
2012

The construction of the model of Constantinople

Posted by: Nikos Voudrislis
PictureWhat was the Byzantine Constantinople like?

This question came up when the students of E’2 class got interested in the monuments of Constantinople in the lesson of History.
The answer is experiential.
The young learners became architects, craftsmen, or workers. Under their teachers’ guidance they took molds, plaster, clay and colours and they made the model of Constantinople so bright as it was in reality.  

Jan
22
2012

Thessaloniki

Posted by: Nikos Voudrislis
PictureThessaloniki is a wonderful city with great history which goes deep in centuries.
Thessaloniki (Greek: Θεσσαλονίκη), historically also known as Thessalonica, Salonika or Salonica, is the second-largest city in Greece and the capital of the region of Central Macedonia.
Thessaloniki is home to numerous notable Byzantine monuments, including the Paleochristian and Byzantine monuments of Thessaloniki, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, as well as several Roman, Ottoman and Sephardic Jewish structures. With a history of over 2,300 years, it is one of Europe's oldest cities. The city's main university, Aristotle University, is the largest in Greece and in the Balkans